Tag: devolution

Strong and Stable? The British Constitution and the 2017 General Election

In this article, first published in Counsel magazine, I consider how constitutional matters influenced the 2017 general election — and what the future constitutional implications of the election generally, and of a hung Parliament in particular, might be.

The Conservative Party Manifesto and the Constitution

The Conservative Party — which, barring an electoral surprise that would make the election of Donald Trump look pedestrian, will form the next UK administration — has published its manifesto. What does it reveal about the constitutional aspects of the party’s programme for government?

House of Lords Constitution Committee reports on Wales Bill

By Mark Elliott and Stephen Tierney The House of Lords Constitution Committee today publishes its report on the Wales Bill. The history of the Bill is a somewhat chequered one, a Draft Bill published in October 2015 having been subjected to excoriating criticism by (among others) the Assembly’s Legislative and Constitutional Affairs Committee. The centrepiece

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1,000 words / Devolution

The current system of devolution in the UK was introduced by the Blair Government in the late 1990s. It involved the creation of new legislative and executive institutions in Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, and the conferral upon them of law-making and administrative powers. A key purpose of devolution is to enable parts of the

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Can Scotland block Brexit?

On The Sunday Politics Scotland today, the First Minister of Scotland, Nicola Sturgeon, raised the prospect of Scotland placing an obstacle in the path of Brexit, saying: “If the Scottish parliament is judging this on the basis of what’s right for Scotland, then the option of saying we’re not going to vote for something that’s against

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