Tag: studying law

Public Law Update #2: The wider constitutional implications of the 2017 general election

The third edition of Public Law was published by Oxford University Press in May 2017. This is the second in a series of posts by the authors, Mark Elliott and Robert Thomas, taking the 2017 election and Brexit as reference points and updating readers on recent developments in the field. These posts are based on updates first published by Oxford University Press in the book’s Online Resource Centre.

Public Law Update #1: The 2017 election, fixed-term Parliaments and ‘confidence and supply’ arrangements

The third edition of Public Law was published by Oxford University Press in May 2017. This is the first in a series of posts by the authors, Mark Elliott and Robert Thomas, taking the 2017 election and Brexit as reference points and updating readers on recent developments in the field. These posts are based on updates first published by Oxford University Press in the book’s Online Resource Centre.

Elliott & Thomas: Public Law

Written by Mark Elliott and Robert Thomas, Public Law is the UK’s best-selling textbook in the field. The following post is based on the preface to the third edition, which was published by Oxford University Press in 2017.

The ‘Black Spider Memos’ Case: An Introduction to Constitutional Law

The “Black Spider Memos” case resulted in the publication of some rather pedestrian correspondence between Prince Charles and Government Ministers. But the Supreme Court’s judgment raises some fascinating constitutional issues

The Admin Law Blog

The Admin Law Blog is a new multi-author blog concerning administrative law in the common law world. I am pleased, at the request of the editors, to cross-post the following piece, in which they announce the launch of their site and set out their vision for it. 

Elliott & Varuhas: Administrative Law

The fifth edition of Administrative Law has been published by Oxford University Press. The new edition is co-written by Mark Elliott, Professor of Public Law at the University of Cambridge, and Jason NE Varuhas, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Melbourne. The following blogpost is based on the authors’ preface to the fifth edition.

Twitter and blogs: A guide for Law students (and others)

Twitter and blogs can be an excellent resource for Law students (and anyone else interested in the subject). Here are some suggestions about who to follow and which blogs are worth reading.