The ‘Black Spider Memos’ Case: An Introduction to Constitutional Law

In a talk I recently gave at the Cambridge Sixth Form Law Conference, I introduced delegates to UK Constitutional Law by way of examining the ‘Black Spider Memos’ case. The Supreme Court’s judgment in that case — more formally known as R (Evans) v Attorney-General [2015] UKSC 21 — came at the end of a long saga involving attempts by Guardian journalist Rob Evans to get hold of so-called advocacy correspondence between Prince Charles and Government Ministers. Evans’s concern was that through such correspondence, Charles may have been seeking to shape Government policy; Evans argued that it was important that people should be able to see what Charles … Continue reading The ‘Black Spider Memos’ Case: An Introduction to Constitutional Law

Elliott & Varuhas, Administrative Law, 5th edition

The fifth edition of Administrative Law has been published by Oxford University Press. The new edition is co-written by Mark Elliott, Professor of Public Law at the University of Cambridge, and Jason NE Varuhas, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Melbourne. The following blogpost is based on the authors’ preface to the fifth edition. In the three decades since its first edition was published, this book — like English administrative law itself — has undergone many changes. The first two editions, published in 1983 and 1989 and written by Sir Jack Beatson and Martin Matthews, took the form of … Continue reading Elliott & Varuhas, Administrative Law, 5th edition

Updated for the 2016-17 academic year: Twitter and blogs for Law students

Anyone who is just starting a Law degree will know that there can be a lot of reading involved. It might therefore seem counterintuitive to suggest that you should supplement the traditional sources — textbooks, articles, cases and so on — that lecturers and tutors will recommend with such things as tweets and blog posts. However, such additional resources, used wisely, can help to bring the subject to life — not least by demonstrating connections between what you are reading about in textbooks and what is going on in the real world.This is true no doubt of many areas of Law, … Continue reading Updated for the 2016-17 academic year: Twitter and blogs for Law students

1,000 words / Fundamental principles explained

Posts in my 1,000 words series address — in roughly a thousand words — a key concept, issue, case or debate relevant to Public Law. The intention is that 1,000 words will evolve into a resource that will address a broad range of key issues in Public Law, and that it will help students better to engage with crucial aspects of the subject. Posts in the 1,000 words series are not intended to replace traditional resources, such as textbooks, but rather to complement them, including by providing additional perspectives and highlighting relationships between the often-interconnected issues that must be confronted if Public Law is to be understood. 1,000 … Continue reading 1,000 words / Fundamental principles explained

For those interested in studying Law at Cambridge: This week’s open days

It’s open day week in Cambridge. If you are thinking about applying to study Law here, there are a number of opportunities to find out more, including at the Faculty of Law’s open day on Wednesday 1 July and the University-wide open days on Thursday 2 and Friday 3 July. In addition, many Colleges are having open days this week or are open to coincide with the University open days. My own College, St Catharine’s, is having open days on Wednesday 1 and Saturday 4 July, and is also open for the University open days on Thursday 2 and Friday … Continue reading For those interested in studying Law at Cambridge: This week’s open days

UK Constitutional Law Association Conference: Debating the Constitution after the Election

On Wednesday 24 June, the UK Constitutional Law Association will be holding a one-day conference at the University of Manchester on the subject of “Debating the Constitution after the Election”. I am delighted to be giving the opening address. The aim of the day is to allow discussion, in the aftermath of the general election, about topical constitutional issues — and, in particular, about how the policies of the new Conservative Government are likely to shape constitutional developments in the coming years. Further details about the conference can be found in the flyer (right) and in this post on the … Continue reading UK Constitutional Law Association Conference: Debating the Constitution after the Election

Revising for your 2015 Public Law exam? Here are some of this year’s key developments and blog highlights

For some readers (perhaps soon to be ex-readers) of this blog, their Public Law exam will be looming. As the end of the academic year approaches, I have been reflecting on some of the key developments in Public Law that have taken place during the last 12 months. The following is not intended in any sense to be comprehensive. Like my 2014 review post, this one simply reflects themes and issues that have caught my interest; the developments on which I have chosen to focus are matters on which I have written in more detail in earlier posts (to which … Continue reading Revising for your 2015 Public Law exam? Here are some of this year’s key developments and blog highlights