Tag: constitutional law

Cambridge Centre for Public Law Seminar / The Miller Judgment: An Evaluation

  Earlier this week, I gave a Cambridge Centre for Public Law Seminar on the subject of the UK Supreme Court’s judgment in R (Miller) v Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union [2017] UKSC 5, in which it was held that the process of withdrawing from the EU under Article 50 of the Treaty on European

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The Conservative Party Manifesto and the Constitution

The Conservative Party — which, barring an electoral surprise that would make the election of Donald Trump look pedestrian, will form the next UK administration — has published its manifesto. What does it reveal about the constitutional aspects of the party’s programme for government?

The “bedroom tax”, Convention rights and secondary legislation

In Secretary of State for Work & Pensions v Carmichael, the Government argued that the First-tier Tribunal could not intervene when housing benefit was reduced under ECHR-incompatible regulations. The Upper Tribunal disagreed. In doing so, it was on strong constitutional ground.

The Government’s White Paper on the “Great Repeal Bill”: Some Preliminary Thoughts

The “Great Repeal Bill” will lay the legislative foundations for the extensive process of legal re-wiring necessitated by Brexit. In its White Paper published in March 2017, the Government set out its plans for the Bill in broad terms — but it is clear that much thinking remains to be done.

“She is constitutionally absolutely wrong”: The Lord Chief Justice on the Lord Chancellor

The Daily Mail called the judges who decided the Miller Article 50 case “enemies of the people”. What, asked the House of Lords Constitution Committee, did the Lord Chief Justice make of the Lord Chancellor’s lacklustre response to such media criticism of the judiciary?

The “Great Repeal Bill” and Delegated Powers

The House of Lords Constitution Committee recently reported on the constitutional issues that are likely to be raised by the “Great Repeal Bill”. This post, written by Mark Elliott and Stephen Tierney, examines some of the key issues addressed by the Committee in its report.