The Great Repeal Bill White Paper in 20 tweets

I posted a number of tweets yesterday extracting key paragraphs from the Government’s White Paper on the Great Repeal Bill and offering some preliminary thoughts on them. For convenience, I have collected the tweets below. Some more detailed comments on the White Paper can be found in this post, in which I draw attention to

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Discarding the fig-leaf of analytical reasoning? The Hutton case and the law/fact distinction

One of the first posts I wrote on this blog concerned the Supreme Court’s decision in Jones  v First-tier Tribunal [2013] UKSC 19. At the heart of the case was the distinction between questions of law and fact, and its implications for judicial oversight of tribunals. The distinction is important because if an issue that

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‘She is constitutionally absolutely wrong’: The Lord Chief Justice on the Lord Chancellor

In his annual evidence session before the House of Lords Constitution Committee on 22 March 2017, the Lord Chief Justice, Lord Thomas, subjected the Lord Chancellor and Justice Secretary, Liz Truss, to extraordinary criticism. I use the word ‘extraordinary’ not in order to imply that anything said by Lord Thomas was inappropriate, but merely to

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The ‘Great Repeal Bill’ and Delegated Powers

By Mark Elliott and Stephen Tierney A good deal of the legal and constitutional interest generated by Brexit has so far, perhaps unsurprisingly, focussed upon the very beginning of the withdrawal process. Initially, all eyes were on the courts, with the Supreme Court holding in R (Miller) v Secretary of State for the European Union

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European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill: Report of House of Lords Constitution Committee

The House of Lords Constitution Committee has published a report on the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill. The Bill, which is presently being considered by the House of Lords, was introduced into Parliament in the wake of the Supreme Court’s judgment in R (Miller) v Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union [2017]

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Oakley v South Cambridgeshire District Council: The maturing of the common law duty to give reasons

In Oakley v South Cambridgeshire District Council [2017] EWCA Civ 71, a Court of Appeal with strong public law credentials — consisting of Elias, Patten and Sales LJJ — addressed the scope of the common law duty to give reasons. In this area, the orthodox position has long been understood to consist in the principle

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Distinguishing Anisminic? Ouster clauses, parliamentary sovereignty and the Privacy International case

Senior judges occasionally find it hard to resist the temptation to speculate about whether parliamentary sovereignty is ‘absolute’ — which, of course, amounts to speculating about whether Parliament is really sovereign at all. One of the principal triggers for such speculation is the question whether Parliament is capable of ousting the courts’ judicial review jurisdiction.

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Deal or no deal: Government ‘concedes’ parliamentary vote on terms of Brexit

Parliament is currently considering the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill. If enacted, it will authorise the Prime Minister to trigger Article 50, thus beginning the process whereby the UK will leave the EU. The Bill, as drafted by the Government, is very short indeed: the Government is evidently hopeful that Parliament will accept a Bill doing the bare

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