The Brexit agreement and citizens’ rights: Can Parliament deliver what the Government has promised?

In the preliminary agreement concerning the terms of Brexit, the UK Government promises to give EU citizens’ rights direct effect in UK law and to make them legally ironclad unless the legislating giving effect to them is itself expressly repealed. But does the principle of parliamentary sovereignty prevent such a high degree of protection from being accorded to citizens’ rights?

Did the Prime Minister accurately answer MPs’ questions about the Miller case and revoking Article 50?

Following her statement to the House of Commons on 9 October 2017 concerning the progress of Brexit negotiations, the Prime Minister was asked the following question by Ben Bradshaw MP: Is it the Prime Minister’s understanding that, if necessary, it is possible to halt the article 50 process? The Prime Minister replied: The position was

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Public Law Update #4: Brexit, the separation of powers and devolution

The third edition of Public Law was published by Oxford University Press in May 2017. This is the last in a series of posts by the authors, Mark Elliott and Robert Thomas, taking the 2017 election and Brexit as reference points and updating readers on recent developments in the field. These posts are based on updates first published by Oxford University Press in the book’s Online Resource Centre.

Public Law Update #3: The EU (Withdrawal) Bill, legal certainty and the rule of law

The third edition of Public Law was published by Oxford University Press in May 2017. This is the third in a series of posts by the authors, Mark Elliott and Robert Thomas, taking the 2017 election and Brexit as reference points and updating readers on recent developments in the field. These posts are based on updates first published by Oxford University Press in the book’s Online Resource Centre.

Public Law Update #2: The wider constitutional implications of the 2017 general election

The third edition of Public Law was published by Oxford University Press in May 2017. This is the second in a series of posts by the authors, Mark Elliott and Robert Thomas, taking the 2017 election and Brexit as reference points and updating readers on recent developments in the field. These posts are based on updates first published by Oxford University Press in the book’s Online Resource Centre.

Public Law Update #1: The 2017 election, fixed-term Parliaments and ‘confidence and supply’ arrangements

The third edition of Public Law was published by Oxford University Press in May 2017. This is the first in a series of posts by the authors, Mark Elliott and Robert Thomas, taking the 2017 election and Brexit as reference points and updating readers on recent developments in the field. These posts are based on updates first published by Oxford University Press in the book’s Online Resource Centre.

Q: What does the Space Industry Bill have to do with the separation of powers? A: More than you’d think

The EU (Withdrawal) Bill has focussed attention on the making of secondary legislation and its separation of powers implications. But in fact most modern legislation confers extensive delegated powers — and the Space Industry Bill, which currently being considered by Parliament, is a textbook example.

Article for Prospect Magazine on the EU (Withdrawal) Bill

I have written a short piece for Prospect magazine about the constitutional issues raised by the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill: MPs today begin debating what was once grandly dubbed the “Great Repeal Bill”. The European Union (Withdrawal) Bill, as it is now more soberly known, is intended to avert legal catastrophe when Britain leaves the EU, by

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