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Brexit | My Cambridge Law in Focus video

Since the early hours of Friday morning, I have written a number of posts about the legal and constitutional and implications of Brexit. Also on Friday, I made a short (nine minute) video as part of the Law in Focus series by the Faculty of Law at Cambridge. (If I look tired in the video, it’s because I’d been awake for the previous 32 hours!) Inevitably, the … Continue reading Brexit | My Cambridge Law in Focus video

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Brexit | A new Prime Minister, or a snap election?

The Prime Minister’s failure to secure a vote in favour of continued EU membership raises obvious questions about both his future and his Government’s. Can the Prime Minister be changed without a general election? And in what circumstances would an early election be possible? Changing the Prime Minister independently of a general election is a straightforward matter — it happened, in decidedly less dramatic circumstances, … Continue reading Brexit | A new Prime Minister, or a snap election?

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Brexit | Legally and constitutionally, what now?

Roughly half of the country is reeling this morning from the  news that the people of United Kingdom have voted — by a narrow but clear majority — to leave the European Union. There is a great deal to be said about what might happen next, and I expect to post regularly as events unfold about the legal and constitutional aspects of the Brexit saga. … Continue reading Brexit | Legally and constitutionally, what now?

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Brexit | “Vote leave, take control”? Sovereignty and the Brexit debate

The following article was published — on the day of the UK’s EU referendum — in German in the print and online editions of the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung. It is reproduced here in English, in a lightly amended form, with permission. I am very grateful indeed to Alexander Schafer for his work on the German translation of the piece. The debate about the UK’s membership of the European Union has turned … Continue reading Brexit | “Vote leave, take control”? Sovereignty and the Brexit debate

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The House of Lords Constitution Committee’s Report on The Union and Devolution

By Mark Elliott and Stephen Tierney The House of Lords Constitution Committee today publishes its report on The Union and Devolution. This post draws attention to some of its main findings. The Constitution Committee’s report on The Union and Devolution, published today, declares the Union to be “under threat”, and recommends that the United Kingdom Government “needs fundamentally to reassess how it approaches issues relating … Continue reading The House of Lords Constitution Committee’s Report on The Union and Devolution

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The 2016 Queen’s Speech and the Constitution

This year’s Queen’s Speech touches on two possible constitutional reform measures. (I pass over the Wales Bill, which was published in draft in October 2015.) The first concerns the replacement of the Human Rights Act 1998 with a “British Bill of Rights”, while second concerns the sovereignty of Parliament and the “primacy” of the House of Commons. If implemented, these measures would be highly significant. … Continue reading The 2016 Queen’s Speech and the Constitution

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1,000 words | Fundamental principles explained

1,000 words is a series of posts that I am gradually putting together over a period of time. Each post in the series addresses — in roughly a thousand words — a key concept, principle, doctrine, institution or debate relevant to Public Law. The intention is that 1,000 words will evolve into a resource that will address a broad range of key issues in Public Law, and that it … Continue reading 1,000 words | Fundamental principles explained