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Tag: rule of law

Constitutional Law

Public Law Update #3: The EU (Withdrawal) Bill, legal certainty and the rule of law

The third edition of Public Law was published by Oxford University Press in May 2017. This is the third in a series of posts by the authors, Mark Elliott and Robert Thomas, taking the 2017 election and Brexit as reference points and updating readers on recent developments in the field. These posts are based on updates first published by Oxford University Press in the book’s Online Resource Centre.

1000 words

1,000 words / The Rule of Law

The rule of law is an axiomatic part of the British constitution. But in order to understand the rule of law properly, it is necessary to consider the specific principles for which it stands — and, just as importantly, what can (and cannot) be done in order to uphold those principles.

Constitutional Law 1

What a (for now failed) attempt to curb judicial review tells us about the UK’s constitution

Over the last couple of weeks, I have been teaching new Constitutional Law students in Cambridge about the fundamental, architectural aspects of the UK constitution, including the rule of law, the separation of powers and the sovereignty of Parliament. The House of Lords’ rejection earlier this week of parts of a Government Bill that aimed restrict the availability of judicial […]

Administrative Law 1

The government’s power to terminate judicial review cases, the rule of law, and the limits of political constitutionalism

A Tunisian man, whose British wife and son live in the UK, is excluded from the country on national security grounds. He challenges that exclusion decision by way of judicial review, but the government “terminates” the proceedings. If that sounds like a Kafkaesque nightmare, then think again. Precisely that factual matrix was at stake in R (Ignaoua) v Secretary of […]

Administrative Law 9

Standing, judicial review and the rule of law: why we all have a “direct interest” in government according to law

According to reports in today’s Times (£) and Telegraph, the government is planning a further set of reforms to judicial review. (I have written before about why the original proposals, published in December 2012, were objectionable—and about the fact that the government pressed ahead with many, but not all, of them, excoriating criticism notwithstanding.) Today, it is said that the Ministry […]

Other 1

The Lord Chief Justice on judicial independence and the rule of law

Lord Judge, the Lord Chief Justice, spoke about judicial independence in his Mansion House speech this week. (The full text of the speech is available here on the CrimeLine Blog, and there is a report on the Telegraph website.) Lord Judge warned that we must remain vigilant against the slightest encroachment on judicial independence, not because judicial independence represents some traditional flummery, some bauble, […]