Tag: featured

On why, as a matter of law, triggering Article 50 does not require Parliament to legislate

In his resignation statement, David Cameron took it to be the case that triggering the UK’s formal withdrawal from the EU under Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union is a matter for the Prime Minister (or, more specifically, the next Prime Minister). Article 50, about which I have written in another post, provides that

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A new Prime Minister, or a snap election?

The Prime Minister’s failure to secure a vote in favour of continued EU membership raises obvious questions about both his future and his Government’s. Can the Prime Minister be changed without a general election? And in what circumstances would an early election be possible? Changing the Prime Minister independently of a general election is a

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The 2016 Queen’s Speech and the Constitution

This year’s Queen’s Speech touches on two possible constitutional reform measures. (I pass over the Wales Bill, which was published in draft in October 2015.) The first concerns the replacement of the Human Rights Act 1998 with a “British Bill of Rights”, while second concerns the sovereignty of Parliament and the “primacy” of the House

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Judicial Power’s 50 “problematic” cases and the limits of the judicial role

The Judicial Power Project has published a list of 50 “problematic” cases. It makes for interesting reading. The aim of the Judicial Power Project is to address the “problem” of “judicial overreach” which, it is said, “increasingly threatens the rule of law and effective, democratic government”. It is odd, therefore, to find on Judicial Power’s

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The duty to give reasons and the new statutory “makes no difference” principle

I wrote in December about what might loosely be termed the “makes no difference” principle introduced by section 84 of the Criminal Justice and Courts Act 2015, which  inserts new provisions into section 31 of the Senior Courts Act 1981. The effect is that in judicial review proceedings the High Court must refuse relief if it

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Henry VIII powers: A follow-up post

I wrote earlier this week about Lord Judge’s recent lecture on Henry VIII powers — that is, powers conferred on the executive to amend or repeal provisions in Acts of Parliament — and parliamentary sovereignty. This post briefly raises two points by way of follow-up. How many Henry VIII powers? No idea, says the Government

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