Tag: Brexit

House of Lords Constitution Committee issues interim report on EU (Withdrawal) Bill

In an interim report on the European Union (Withdrawal) Bill, the House of Lords Constitution Committee has said that the “political, legal and constitutional significance of the Bill is unparalleled”. In this post, Mark Elliott and Stephen Tierney examine the main points made in the report and comment on the key issues raised by it.

The Devil in the Detail: Twenty Questions about the EU (Withdrawal) Bill

The EU (Withdrawal) Bill is an enormously complex piece of legislation which is likely to bequeath a similarly complex — and uncertain — post-Brexit legal system. Examining the Bill will present Parliament with a unique challenge. In the interests of promoting scrutiny and debate, this post sets out 20 questions that highlight important, and sometimes fundamental, ambiguities and difficulties in relation to the Bill as it is presently drafted.

A “blatant power grab”? The Scottish Government on the EU (Withdrawal) Bill

The Scottish Government has issued a statement saying that the EU (Withdrawal) Bill is a “blatant power grab” to which the Scottish Parliament is unlikely to consent. Is the Scottish Government right to characterise the Bill thus? And what will happen if consent to it is not forthcoming?

The EU (Withdrawal) Bill: Initial Thoughts

This post looks in some detail (albeit preliminarily) at how the EU (Withdrawal) Bill works, and comments on some of the key constitutional issues that it raises. A shorter post on the Bill, which forms part of my 1,000 words series, can be found here.

The 2017 Queen’s Speech and the (no longer “Great”) Repeal Bill

The Repeal Bill will remove the European Communities Act 1972 from the statute book while enabling large swathes of European Union law to be kept in force following the UK’s exit from the EU. What light does the Queen’s Speech cast upon this key piece of Brexit legislation?

Strong and Stable? The British Constitution and the 2017 General Election

In this article, first published in Counsel magazine, I consider how constitutional matters influenced the 2017 general election — and what the future constitutional implications of the election generally, and of a hung Parliament in particular, might be.

Cambridge Centre for Public Law Seminar / The Miller Judgment: An Evaluation

  Earlier this week, I gave a Cambridge Centre for Public Law Seminar on the subject of the UK Supreme Court’s judgment in R (Miller) v Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union [2017] UKSC 5, in which it was held that the process of withdrawing from the EU under Article 50 of the Treaty on European

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