The right to decide about the right to die

It was impossible to feel anything but sympathy for Tony Nicklinson, who died a few days ago of pneumonia. Nicklinson suffered from “locked-in syndrome”: left almost entirely paralysed (but intellectually unimpaired) by a stroke, he considered that his quality of life was so low that it would be preferable to die. But his physical incapacity meant

Continue reading

A right not to be offended?

The “Twitter joke case” – on which I posted earlier in the week – prompted an interesting article in yesterday’s Guardian. In it, John Kampfner, former chief executive of Index on Censorship, argues that “the public, both Twitter-using and non-Twitter-using, have elevated taking offence to a human right. We see hurt and danger around every corner

Continue reading