Cambridge Public Law Conference: Detailed programme published

The full programme for the 2014 Cambridge Public Law Conference has now been published. It provides details of all plenary sessions and parallel panel sessions, and will enable those attending the conference to plan their time ahead of arrival in Cambridge. The programme can be accessed via the conference website or viewed below. Registered participants will shortly be… Continue reading Cambridge Public Law Conference: Detailed programme published

Current Legal Problems Lecture: Abstract

On Thursday 5 March 2015, I will be giving a lecture in the Current Legal Problems series at University College London. I will be speaking to the title: "A post-European British constitution: plus ça change?" I am delighted that Lord Reed JSC has agreed to chair the lecture. My abstract is as follows: The United Kingdom’s constitution is… Continue reading Current Legal Problems Lecture: Abstract

The Canadian human-rights model: a brief response to Richard Edwards

In one of several recent blog posts about the possibility of UK withdrawal from the ECHR, Richard Edwards — responding to earlier posts by Gavin Phillipson and me — considers the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, section 33 of which, in effect, allows struck-down rights-incompatible statutes to be reinstated by the legislature, “notwithstanding” the… Continue reading The Canadian human-rights model: a brief response to Richard Edwards

ECHR withdrawal and a British Bill of Rights: some resources

There have been a number of recent blog posts in recent days considering different aspects of the possibility of UK withdrawal from the European Convention on Human Rights — a hare that was set running by media reports that the Conservative Party might be contemplating something along these lines. Here is a list of the ones I… Continue reading ECHR withdrawal and a British Bill of Rights: some resources

Human rights reform and the role of the Strasbourg Court

I wrote last week about the dismissal of Dominic Grieve as Attorney-General and subsequent indications as to the likely direction of Conservative Party policy in relation to human rights. As noted in the latter post, the plan—such as it is at present—appears to countenance the possibility of the UK’s departure from the European Convention on… Continue reading Human rights reform and the role of the Strasbourg Court

A hardening of Conservative human rights policy: what are the options?

I noted earlier this week that the dismissal of Dominic Grieve as Attorney-General was likely to foreshadow a significant hardening of the Conservative Party’s stance in relation to the European Convention on Human Rights. Today, the BBC is reporting—following Grieve’s removal, the departure of arch-Europhile Kenneth Clark and William Hague’s move from the Foreign Office—that:… Continue reading A hardening of Conservative human rights policy: what are the options?

Why Dominic Grieve’s departure from the Government might hasten the UK’s withdrawal from the ECHR

Dominic Grieve, who has served as Attorney-General since the 2010 general election, and who was a strong supporter of the UK’s ongoing membership of the European Convention on Human Rights, has left the Government. He is replaced by Jeremy Wright, previously Minister for Prisons and Rehabilitation in the Ministry of Justice. Calling the significance of… Continue reading Why Dominic Grieve’s departure from the Government might hasten the UK’s withdrawal from the ECHR

Should judges lead public inquiries?

The appointment of former Court of Appeal judge Lady Butler-Sloss as chair of the recently announced inquiry into historical allegations of child abuse attracted criticism principally because of suggestions of the appearance of a conflict of interest. Although, in the face of such criticism, she has now resigned, the broader—and more fundamental—question remains: should judges lead public inquiries… Continue reading Should judges lead public inquiries?

The right to die: deference, dialogue and the division of constitutional authority

The UK Supreme Court’s decision in R (Nicklinson) v Ministry of Justice [2014] UKSC 38 is one of the most constitutionally significant and interesting judgments that has been given under the Human Rights Act 1998 in recent years. The case is also of potentially great social importance, given the nature of changes to the law… Continue reading The right to die: deference, dialogue and the division of constitutional authority

Should academic lawyers blog?

As an academic lawyer who writes his own blog, as well as contributing occasionally to others, my answer to the question “Should academic lawyers blog?” is, perhaps unsurprisingly, “Yes”. However, I have been prompted — by agreeing to talk about blogging at a conference on the teaching of public law held at City Law School — to reflect more carefully on whether, and if so why, writing and contributing to blogs is something that academic lawyers should do.