Deal or no deal: Government ‘concedes’ parliamentary vote on terms of Brexit

Parliament is currently considering the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill. If enacted, it will authorise the Prime Minister to trigger Article 50, thus beginning the process whereby the UK will leave the EU. The Bill, as drafted by the Government, is very short indeed: the Government is evidently hopeful that Parliament will accept a Bill doing the bare

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House of Lords Constitution Committee takes evidence on ‘Great Repeal Bill’

On 1 February, the House of Lords Constitution Committee took evidence from Professors John Bell, Paul Craig and Alison Young on the likely constitutional implications of the ‘Great Repeal Bill’. The ‘Great Repeal Bill’ is not to be confused with the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill, which is currently before Parliament. The latter Bill was introduced

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1,000 words / The Supreme Court’s Judgment in Miller

In this 1,000 words post I analyse and reflect upon the Supreme Court’s judgment in R (Miller) v Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union [2017] UKSC 5. Since writing this post, I have completed work on a longer article on Miller for the Cambridge Law Journal. A pre-publication version of the article can be downloaded here.

Elliott & Varuhas: Administrative Law

The fifth edition of Administrative Law has been published by Oxford University Press. The new edition is co-written by Mark Elliott, Professor of Public Law at the University of Cambridge, and Jason NE Varuhas, Associate Professor of Law at the University of Melbourne. The following blogpost is based on the authors’ preface to the fifth edition.

Brexit, sovereignty, and the contemporary British constitution: Four perspectives on Miller

To say that the Miller case has stimulated a wide-ranging constitutional debate would be to engage in rash understatement. The pages of the UK Constitutional Law Association Blog, in particular, are replete with posts that examine the issues raised by the case from a rich variety of perspectives and which advance a broad spectrum of

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1,000 words / The Miller case in the Supreme Court: The key arguments

The decision of the Supreme Court in Miller — in which the UK Government will ask the Supreme Court to rule that the Article 50 process for withdrawing from the EU can be initiated without parliamentary involvement — may have significant consequences for how Brexit unfolds. But the Court is certainly not being asked to

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