Category: Constitutional Law

Why Chris Grayling’s appointment as Justice Secretary is significant #2: The fate of the Human Rights Act

In an earlier post, I explained why the appointment of a non-lawyer – Chris Grayling – to the position of Justice Secretary and Lord Chancellor is significant. But as well as being noteworthy because Grayling isn’t a lawyer, the appointment is potentially important for another, more specific reason. As Justice Secretary, Graying will play a

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Why Chris Grayling’s appointment as Justice Secretary is significant #1: The first non-lawyer Lord Chancellor

Yesterday’s Government reshuffle is important (although perhaps not as important as media coverage might imply) for all sorts of reasons. For lawyers, one of the most significant aspects is the change at the top of the Ministry of Justice, Kenneth Clark having been replaced by Chris Grayling. The change is significant because the Ministry of

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The right to decide about the right to die

It was impossible to feel anything but sympathy for Tony Nicklinson, who died a few days ago of pneumonia. Nicklinson suffered from “locked-in syndrome”: left almost entirely paralysed (but intellectually unimpaired) by a stroke, he considered that his quality of life was so low that it would be preferable to die. But his physical incapacity meant

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